Optomec Reports $2 Million in Orders from Leading Media and Technology OEM


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Optomec Inc., the leading supplier of 3D Additive Electronics manufacturing solutions, announced the receipt of orders totaling approximately $2 Million from a premier supplier of digital connectivity solutions. The recent orders include the delivery of three (3) Aerosol Jet 3D Electronics Printers, together with related Software and Digital Products, plus professional services to support their application development. The customer is leveraging Optomec’s patented Aerosol Jet process for the development and ultimate production of a variety of next generation Wearable devices.

Wearables represent one of the fastest growing segments of the consumer electronics and healthcare markets. Examples include Smart Watches, Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs), AR/VR Headsets, Smart Clothing, E-Textiles, etc. which together are projected to generate well more than $150 Billion in annual end-product sales by 2030.

A unique feature of wearables is that they conform to the human body, which most often requires that they be 3-dimensional in shape and often flexible. Additionally, they are ideally comfortable for the user, which requires that they be minimally intrusive; ie: as small and pliable as possible. Such specialized requirements are uniquely well served by the advantages of Optomec’s patented Aerosol Jet 3D Printed Electronics manufacturing process,

“These recent orders are another example of Optomec’s ability to generate repeat sales from existing customers as they march down the path to production” said Dave Ramahi, Optomec CEO. “In this example, we began with some novel developments in our applications lab to demonstrate printing of stretchable circuitry, as well as our mainstay 3D conformal electronics capabilities, which are enabling for the customer’s product designs.”

Optomec’s patented Aerosol Jet 3D Electronics Printers are an Additive Electronics solution uniquely capable of directly printing high resolution conductive circuitry, with feature sizes as small as 10 microns. The process is further differentiated by its ability to print onto non-planar substrates and fully 3-dimensional end-parts. Production applications include direct printing of 3D Antenna, 3D Sensors, Medical Electronics, Semiconductor Packaging and wrap-around 3 Interconnects for Displays.

Optomec_Fig1.jpg

The extreme in Aerosol Jet printed Wearable Devices: Left – Stretchable, skin-like electrode patch to demonstrate an active Brain-Machine Interface (credit: Georgia Tech); Right – Stretchable Tactile Sensor (credit: University of Cambridge).

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