To the Windy City and Back Again


Reading time ( words)

Posted by Adam Murling on Monday, November 24, 2014


 

This is an account of my trip to Indium's Chicago facility. If you didn't get a chance to read my previous post, the link is right here.  Both flights were flawless which made me happy as this was my first time flying by myself. I was a little nervous but was relieved when the weather was nice both days. Other than having to de-ice the plane leaving Syracuse, everything was great. I learned a lot working out of Indium Corporation's Chicago facility. I learned about the day-to-day activities - along with the activities of the extraordinary people. I worked on the manufacturing floor and met some very interesting individuals. They showed me how to make flux, extrude both flux-cored and solid wire, cast ingots, and refine the wire down to specific lengths for final sale. The most interesting aspect, to me, was making the flux.  I experienced both large and small batch operations. I have always enjoyed chemistry and it was nice to look at something from that perspective. Also, I worked with a wave soldering machine for the first time. It was pretty interesting; a lot different than stencil printing, and reflowing. There are so many different variables, such as: flux deposition, wave height, conveyor speed, preheat temperature, and wave temperature. I would consider it an art to run one of these machines. Each one has its own personality and quirks that makes it unique. The way the metal flowed was amazing in its own right. Profiling a wave solder machine can be more difficult than a traditional reflow oven. If you want to read more on wave solder flux, please read Eric Bastow's, blog. This particular post is about an inappropriate method that is sometimes used in wave solder flux evaluation. A diagram of the basic mechanisms of a wave solder machine is pictured below (source).

I am very grateful for this opportunity to travel to Chicago and learn so much about our products, processes, and people. I can not wait to do it again. Also, I was able to try my first slice of the famous Chicago deep dish pizza.  I understand why they call it a pizza "pie". I'm going to say that I still think New York pizza is better. Now that I m back home, I feel safer saying that. ‘Til Next Time, - Adam

Share




Suggested Items

EPTAC Primed for SMTA International

10/19/2022 | Andy Shaughnessy, I-Connect007
I recently spoke with Leo Lambert, vice president of technology for EPTAC, about the training company’s newest classes and his plans for the upcoming SMTA International. The event, co-located with the Medical Device & Manufacturing (MD&M) Show, takes place in Minneapolis Oct. 31—Nov. 3. It’s never a dull moment in this industry and Leo takes a few minutes to talk about his company’s certification efforts, what’s planned for SMTAI, and where some of this technology is headed. Swallowing a pill that measures diagnostics? It’s a great time to be in the industry.

Solder Paste Printing and Optimizations for Interconnecting Back Contact Cells

07/26/2022 | Narahari S Pujari and Krithika PM, MacDermid Alpha Electronics Solutions
The interdigitated back contact (IBC) is one of the methods to achieve rear contact solar cell interconnection. The contact and interconnection via rear side theoretically achieve higher efficiency by moving all the front contact grids to the rear side of the device. This results in all interconnection structures being located behind the cells, which brings two main advantages. First, there is no frontside shading of the cell by the interconnection ribbons, thus eliminating the need for trading off series resistance, losses for shading losses when using larger interconnection ribbons. Second, a more homogeneous looking frontside of the solar module enhances the aesthetics.

Book Excerpt: 'The Printed Circuit Assembler’s Guide to… Solder Defects'

06/07/2022 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
Solder defects in surface-mount technology (SMT) assembly have been an issue for decades. Further, the combined challenges of Pb-free soldering and ever-increasing miniaturization have resulted in new or exacerbated defects in electronics assembly, but there are proven ways to avoid defects. This book will be especially beneficial to PCB assemblers in improving their assembly processes and the reliability of the end-product, eliminating field failures, and reducing costs.



Copyright © 2022 I-Connect007 | IPC Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.